Much Ado About Nothing | Critical Essay by Robert Ornstein

This literature criticism consists of approximately 31 pages of analysis & critique of Much Ado About Nothing.
This section contains 10,406 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael Mangan

Critical Essay by Robert Ornstein

SOURCE: “Much Ado about Nothing,” in Shakespeare's Comedies: From Roman Farce to Romantic Mystery, University of Delaware Press, 1986, pp. 119-40.

In the following essay, Ornstein introduces Much Ado about Nothing by examining the characters and changing moods of the play and comparing it to Shakespeare's other comedies.

If Much Ado is not the most genial of the comedies, it is perhaps the most satisfying in form and substance. It is warm as well as witty, and compassionate in its view of human frailties and limitations. Its chief characters, Beatrice and Benedick, are the most attractive pair of lovers in the comedies—the only ones perhaps who are equally matched in intelligence, humor, and humanity. Except for the morose Don John, the other characters are engaging enough to win an audience's affection. None is as coarse...

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This section contains 10,406 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael Mangan