Much Ado About Nothing | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Stephen B. Dobranski

This literature criticism consists of approximately 25 pages of analysis & critique of Much Ado About Nothing.
This section contains 7,384 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen B. Dobranski

Critical Essay by Stephen B. Dobranski

SOURCE: “Children of the Mind: Miscarried Narratives in Much Ado about Nothing,Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 38, No. 2, Spring, 1998, pp. 233-50.

In the following essay, Dobranski traces the “undeveloped, fragmentary history” of the relationship between Benedick and Beatrice, which inflects the light mood of the comedy with tragic elements.

An idea for a short story about people in Manhattan who are constantly creating these real unnecessary neurotic problems for themselves ’cause it keeps them from dealing with more unsolvable, terrifying problems about the universe. 

—Woody Allen, Manhattan

When Beatrice first speaks in Much Ado about Nothing, she inquires after Benedick: “I pray you, is Signior Mountanto returned from the wars or no?” (I.i.28-9).1 That her first concern is Benedick's welfare suggests...

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This section contains 7,384 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen B. Dobranski