All's Well That Ends Well | Literature Criticism Motive and Meaning in All's Well That Ends Well

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of All's Well That Ends Well.
This section contains 9,629 words
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Ruth Nevo, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

All's Well That Ends Well has been classified among the problem comedies, perhaps mainly because Bertram has failed to captivate; he has been found even more devoid of charm than Angelo in Measure for Measure, the companion "problem" comedy. Bertram is, as my students invariably inform me, a creep. And in this they have the critics on their side: that he is "a thoroughly disagreeable, peevish and vicious person" (Lawrence 1931, 61) seems to be the consensus. One is hard put to it, indeed, to think of a fictional character less popular than the young Count of Rossillion. Yet Helena has come in for her share of criticism too. She is forward, obstinate, manipulative, opportunistic. She does not heal the King out of patriotic fervor but because she has an eye...

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This section contains 9,629 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Motive and Meaning in All's Well That Ends Well