George Moore (novelist) | Critical Essay by The Spectator

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of George Moore (novelist).
This section contains 936 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: A review of In Single Strictness, in The Spectator, Vol. 129, No. 4915, September 9, 1922, p. 342.

In the following essay, the critic provides a laudatory review of In Single Strictness.

Mr. George Moore's revised volume In Single Strictness is a book of short stories, all of which have one central theme—celibacy. Wilfred Holmes, whose history makes the first story, is a celibate from futility. Priscilla and Emily Lofft are orphan twins, so brought up that they have no opportunity of marriage and no knowledge of the world. Hugh Monfert is a celibate for a variety of reasons, some of them sinister, or, rather, tragic; Henrietta Marrremains unmarried from a kind of cold selfishness, a desire to sell herself as dear as possible; and Sarah Gwynn for exquisite reasons of religious unselfishness. Mr. George Moore's characters are all real, not pseudo, celibates, but he is more...

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This section contains 936 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by The Spectator
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by The Spectator from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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