The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay.
This section contains 3,182 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Tom Deignan

SOURCE: “Playing with Kiddie Dynamite,” in World & I, Vol. 16, No. 2, February, 2001, p. 220.

In the following essay, Deignan examines the narrative structure, authorial voice, and thematic significance of comic books in The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay.

It's not hard to imagine the great works of American literature as comic books. Think of Huck and Jim diving into the Mississippi, in a colorful explosion of white foam and splintered wood, just as their raft is destroyed by a steamboat. Or think of Gatsby, a soft-focus silhouette at dusk, staring out at the harbor with its flashing lights. Such imagery is easy to imagine, not only because these are memorable and vivid archetypes, but because there have already been countless versions of “classic” comic book lit. In fact, as American as the comic book is, foreigners such as raging King Lear, or even suffering Job, have found their anguished words...

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This section contains 3,182 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Tom Deignan
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Critical Essay by Tom Deignan from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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