Metamorphoses | Critical Essay by A. M. Keith

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Metamorphoses.
This section contains 2,318 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: Keith, A. M. “Etymological Wordplay in Ovid's ‘Pyramus and Thisbe’ (Met. 4.55-166).” Classical Quarterly 51, New Series, no. 1 (2001): 309-12.

In the following essay, Keith gives examples of how Ovid uses wordplay to reinforce narrative relationships.

A wide range of readers and artists has enjoyed Ovid's ‘Pyramus and Thisbe’,1 but the tale has provoked critical attention on two counts: Ovid's source(s) cannot be identified2 and the simile applied to Pyramus' death agonies ruptures the sentimental tone of the narrative (4.121-4).3 In classical Greek literature, Pyramus is the name of a Cilician river mentioned by geographical writers and historians in geographical contexts,4 while Thisbe is the name of a famous Boeotian city5 and an obscure Cilician spring.6 Late antique Greek mythographers give these names to human figures, young lovers who die tragically and are metamorphosed into the...

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This section contains 2,318 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by A. M. Keith
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