Guy de Maupassant | Critical Essay by Mary L. Poteau-Tralie

This literature criticism consists of approximately 58 pages of analysis & critique of Guy de Maupassant.
This section contains 17,196 words
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Critical Essay by Mary L. Poteau-Tralie

SOURCE: "Violating a Sacred Bond: Monstrous Mothers on Trial," in Voices of Authority: Criminal Obsession in Guy de Maupassant's Short Works, Peter Lang, 1995, pp. 45-87.

In the following excerpt, Poteau-Tralie traces the portrayal of the mother in Maupassant's works—focusing on the "good" mother, the criminal mother, the monstrous mother, and the "unnatural" mother—within the context of prevailing nineteenth-century thought; Maupassant's childhood; his thoughts on God, religion, and children; and his worldview.

2.1 Introduction

Maupassant paints a generally cynical picture of women in his fiction; however, one type of woman enjoys a unique and privileged position: the mother. There is a definite evolutionary process from the earliest short stories in which an idealization of the concept of motherhood is placed upon a pedestal, to the increasingly pessimistic portrayal of mothers which marks the final works. One...

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This section contains 17,196 words
(approx. 58 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mary L. Poteau-Tralie