Mary Lamb | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of Mary Lamb.
This section contains 5,736 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jean I. Marsden

SOURCE: Marsden, Jean I. “Letters on a Tombstone: Mothers and Literacy in Mary Lamb's Mrs. Leicester's School.Children's Literature: Annual of the Modern Language Association Division on Children 23 (1995): 31-44.

In the following essay, Marsden discussesMrs. Leicester's School, arguing that Lamb's relationship with her mother influenced the lack of a stereotypical maternal figure apparent in other similar works.

The gift of education represented so vividly in Maria Edgeworth's “Madame de Fleury” stands in contrast to a more problematic vision of education published within a year of Edgeworth's work. In Edgeworth's tale, unlike the work by Mary Lamb that is the subject for this essay, formal schooling is the gift of a benevolent maternal figure who enriches a child's life and in so doing reiterates a cultural expectation linking mothers, or mother surrogates, and education.1 Mothers, writes Hannah More, are responsible for, and even empowered through, educating their children...

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This section contains 5,736 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jean I. Marsden
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Critical Essay by Jean I. Marsden from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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