'Night, Mother | Critical Essay by William W. Demastes

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of 'Night, Mother.
This section contains 3,217 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William W. Demastes

SOURCE: "New Voices Using New Realism: Fuller, Henley, and Norman," in Beyond Naturalism: A New Realism in American Theatre, Greenwood Press, 1988, pp. 125-54.

In the following excerpt, Demastes examines Norman's efforts to convey complex but inarticulate characters in 'night, Mother.

With Marsha Norman's play 'night, Mother (1982; Pulitzer Prize 1983), the Pulitzer Prize was awarded to a play with designs more closely related to feminist concerns than Beth Henley's more Southern pieces. Norman's focus is on women, and her plays present worlds filled with commonplace events and common people, those not in privileged positions in society. Their portrayals in turn reveal worlds and lives that are essentially meaningless. These simple lives, though, extend beyond those people living them. The effect is more general, as Jack Kroll in a review of Norman's Traveler in the Dark (1984) observes: "Marsha Norman is one of those writers who are natural...

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This section contains 3,217 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William W. Demastes
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by William W. Demastes from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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