The Merry Men and Other Tales and Fables | Critical Essay by Irving S. Saposnik

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of The Merry Men and Other Tales and Fables.
This section contains 2,509 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Irving S. Saposnik

Critical Essay by Irving S. Saposnik

SOURCE: Saposnik, Irving S. “A Single Glimpse, A Few Sharp Sounds.” In Robert Louis Stevenson, pp. 60–2, 75–9. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1974.

In the following excerpt, Saposnik offers a psychological reading of “Markheim,” concluding that Markheim's surrender to the police “is neither good nor evil.”

Stevenson's reputation rests on his unquestioned abilities as a storyteller. Working with both short and long fiction, he produced stories and novels that are generally considered to be the creations of a first-rate narrative talent. Stories such as Jekyll and Hyde and novels such as Kidnapped were immediately able to give him the recognition he sought, and they subsequently kept alive his literary name even when his popularity dimmed. His narrative ability, however, did not always manifest itself equally: too many...

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This section contains 2,509 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Irving S. Saposnik
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