The Merry Men and Other Tales and Fables | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of The Merry Men and Other Tales and Fables.
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Buy the Critical Essay by Alfred C. Ward

SOURCE: Ward, Alfred C. “Robert Louis Stevenson: ‘The Merry Men.’” In Aspects of the Modern Short Story: English and American, pp. 102–15. London: University of London Press, 1924.

In the following excerpt, Ward asserts that “Markheim,” although it strains the reader's credibility, is successful as a parable with a stated moral.

Stevenson's earliest short stories (the “New Arabian Nights” series) ran in the pages of magazines in 1878; nine years later, Kipling's “Plain Tales from the Hills” (his first prose volume) was published. It is with these two collections—belonging, roughly speaking, to the eighteen-eighties—that the cult of the short story by British writers may be said to begin: half a century or so after the form had been naturalized in America.

Even in regard to that late date...

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This section contains 2,765 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alfred C. Ward
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Critical Essay by Alfred C. Ward from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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