Marianne Moore | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 25 pages of analysis & critique of Marianne Moore.
This section contains 6,413 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jeanne Heuving

SOURCE: Heuving, Jeanne. “‘An Artist in Refusing’.” In Omissions Are Not Accidents: Gender in the Art of Marianne Moore, pp. 17-29. Detroit, Mich.: Wayne State University Press, 1992.

In the following essay, Heuving explores the influence of gender on Moore's voice and identity as a literary figure among predominantly male peers.

What allows us to proceed … is that we interpret, at each “moment,” the specular make-up of discourse, that is, the self-reflecting … organization of the subject in … discourse. This language work would thus attempt … to return the masculine to its own language, leaving open the possibility of a different language. Which means that the masculine would no longer be “everything.”

—Luce Irigaray, This Sex Which Is Not One1

I read my story yesterday in the proof—I like it fine—It's slight as an ice-coated twig but “it is I.”

—Marianne Moore, letter to family (1908)2

Alongside the high acclaim...

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This section contains 6,413 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jeanne Heuving
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