A Life in the Theatre | Critical Essay by Martin Duberman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of A Life in the Theatre.
This section contains 503 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Martin Duberman

Critical Essay by Martin Duberman

[A Life in the Theatre is Mamet's] least characteristic play. Ordinarily he works from an oblique angle of vision, in flat tones. Life is all surface flamboyance, sight gags and gimmickry, lush language and posturing—in short, closer to a Feydeau farce than to the Beckett-like minimalism to which Mamet more typically aspires…. At its best, Life is a mildly amusing diversion; at its more frequent worst, it is a tedious, offensively banal caricature of what daily life in the theater is actually like.

The sheer awkwardness of the play surprised me, since Mamet is the most technically proficient of the new writers. In The Water Engine he manages skillfully to juxtapose a 1930s radio play about an idealistic young inventor pursued by the evil forces of corporate greed with the inane chatter of a "Century of Progress...

(read more)

This section contains 503 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Martin Duberman