Magic Realism | Critical Essay by Mary Kinzie

This literature criticism consists of approximately 36 pages of analysis & critique of Magic Realism.
This section contains 10,786 words
(approx. 36 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mary Kinzie

SOURCE: “Succeeding Borges, Escaping Kafka: On the Fiction of Steven Millhauser,” in Salmagundi, No. 92, Fall, 1991, pp. 115-44.

In the following essay, Kinzie comments on elements of both magic realism and horror in the works of Steven Millhauser.

“Sinbad shifts in his seat.” So reads a sentence from a remarkable new story by Steven Millhauser, “The Eighth Voyage of Sinbad.”1 The diction, demeanor, indeed the whole rhetorical and genre “set” of that sentence is peculiar. Sinbad, the quasi-mythic hero of the Thousand and One Nights, the object (as Millhauser points out) of Scheherazade's meticulous suspensions of plot over the abyss of her death-sentence, and finally a meandering and befuddled narrator (of particular interest to our author) who can remember each voyage in greater detail than any text has ever suggested...

(read more)

This section contains 10,786 words
(approx. 36 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mary Kinzie
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Mary Kinzie from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook