Macbeth | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Macbeth.
This section contains 8,835 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William O. Scott

SOURCE: Scott, William O. “Macbeth's—and Our—Self-Equivocations.” Shakespeare Quarterly 37, no. 2 (summer 1986): 160-74.

In the following essay, Scott explores the relationship between self-knowledge and verbal equivocation in Macbeth.

MALCOLM
                                                            For even now 
I put myself to thy direction, and 
Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjure 
The taints and blames I laid upon myself, 
For strangers to my nature. I am yet 
Unknown to woman, never was forsworn, 
Scarcely have coveted what was mine own, 
At no time broke my faith, would not betray 
The devil to his fellow, and delight 
No less in truth than life. My first false speaking 
Was this upon myself. … 
MACDUFF
Such welcome and unwelcome things at once 
'Tis hard to reconcile. 

(Macbeth, IV.iii.121-39)

[G. E. Moore] had a kind of exquisite purity. I have never but once succeeded in making him tell a lie, and that was by a subterfuge. “Moore...

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This section contains 8,835 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William O. Scott
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Critical Essay by William O. Scott from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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