Macbeth | Critical Essay by Arthur Lindley

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of Macbeth.
This section contains 3,435 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Arthur Lindley

SOURCE: Lindley, Arthur. “Scotland Saved from History: Welles's Macbeth and the Ahistoricism of Medieval Film.” Literature/Film Quarterly 29, no. 2 (2001): 96-100.

In the following essay, Lindley considers Orson Welles's film version of Macbeth as a powerful influence on later filmic representations of the European Middle Ages.

I want to consider Welles's Macbeth in a different frame from the usual ones, viewing it less as a Shakespearean or Wellesian film than as a medieval one. From its opening words, the film stakes a claim to historicity—claiming to depict the period of Christianity's first penetration of a barbarian world—that is belied by virtually everything that follows: the visual invocations of westerns and film noir, the anachronistic grotesqueries of costuming, the fabular simplification of character to the demands of a parable about the resistible rise of gothic tyranny, what Michael Anderegg...

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This section contains 3,435 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Arthur Lindley
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Arthur Lindley from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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