Macbeth | Critical Essay by Lisa Low

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of Macbeth.
This section contains 4,702 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lisa Low

SOURCE: Low, Lisa. “Ridding Ourselves of Macbeth.” Massachusetts Review 24, no. 4 (winter 1983): 826-37.

In the following essay, Low contends that Macbeth is sympathetic to audiences in his remorsefulness, and that he guides the drama toward a possible path of redemption.

But where there is danger, There grows also what saves. 

Hölderlin

Unlike most tragic heroes, Macbeth is much less sinned against than sinning, which makes him a strange candidate for our affections.1 He does not fall prey to infirmity like Lear, nor is he ignorant of what he does like Oedipus. He is not like Romeo, well-intentioned but too hasty; nor is he like Hamlet, Romeo's inverse, too cool. Too hot to stop, too cool to feel, Macbeth is no Romeo and no Hamlet. He is a fiend and a butcher. Standing before him, we cannot but be paralyzed...

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This section contains 4,702 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lisa Low
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Lisa Low from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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