Mary Elizabeth Braddon | Critical Essay by Natalie Schroeder

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Mary Elizabeth Braddon.
This section contains 7,153 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Natalie Schroeder

Critical Essay by Natalie Schroeder

SOURCE: “Feminine Sensationalism, Eroticism, and Self-Assertion: M. E. Braddon and Ouida,” in Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, Vol. 7, No. 1, Spring, 1988, pp. 87-103.

In the following essay, Schroeder analyzes the ways in which sensationalist writers like Braddon encouraged Victorian women to subvert repressive social conventions.

Twentieth-century critics have recently affirmed the historical, social, and literary importance of popular Victorian fiction.1 Mary Elizabeth Braddon's and Ouida's (Marie Louise de la Ramee) sensational novels are especially significant today for what they reveal about Victorian women's resistance to conventionally prescribed social roles. By rejecting the prudish moral tone that characterized popular fiction of the 1850s and by devouring novels filled with crime, passion, and sensuality, Victorian women readers began in the 1860s to rebel against the establishment. Monica Fryckstedt attributes the success of sensation novels to the fact that &#x...

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This section contains 7,153 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Natalie Schroeder
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