Luddite | Critical Essay by Malcolm I. Thomis

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Luddite.
This section contains 9,867 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: Thomis, Malcolm I. “Machine-Breakers and Luddites.” In The Luddites: Machine-Breaking in Regency England, pp. 11-40. Newton Abbot, Eng.: David & Charles, 1970.

In the following excerpt, Thomis discusses the social and political context of the Luddite Rebellion and attempts to define exactly who the Luddites were and what they sought to achieve. He also examines inconsistencies in depictions of Luddism in writings from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The Luddites present initially a problem of definition. It is useless to write or argue about them unless their identity is clear.

Employers were being threatened by letters signed ‘Ned Ludd’ in December 1811, and in that month the Nottingham Review carried reports of stocking-frame breakers or ‘Luddites as they are now called’. The name was first used, it seems, of men who broke stocking-frames in 1811, and shortly afterwards...

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This section contains 9,867 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Malcolm I. Thomis
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Malcolm I. Thomis from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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