On the Nature of Things | Critical Essay by Anthony M. Esolen

This literature criticism consists of approximately 29 pages of analysis & critique of On the Nature of Things.
This section contains 8,440 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Anthony M. Esolen

SOURCE: Esolen, Anthony M. “Introduction.” In Lucretius: “On the Nature of Things: De rerum natura,” edited and translated by Anthony M. Esolen. pp. 1-21. Baltimore, Md.: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.

In the following excerpt, Esolen explains that Lucretius wrote the De rerum natura to fight superstition. He also examines Lucretius's influence on Vergil, Cicero, Horace, and other writers.

Lucretius's Milieu

We know little about Titus Lucretius Carus. He was probably born in the early first century b.c., with 99 and 95 the limits of possibility. The year 55 is usually given for his death. Saint Jerome, following a lost work by the historian Suetonius, relates two tantalizing bits of gossip about Lucretius: that Cicero edited his great poem, and that he was poisoned by a madness-inducing aphrodisiac given him by his...

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This section contains 8,440 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Anthony M. Esolen