Love's Labor's Lost | Critical Essay by David Bevington

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of Love's Labor's Lost.
This section contains 8,495 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by David Bevington

SOURCE: "'Jack Hath Not Jill': Failed Courtship in Lyly and Shakespeare," in Shakespeare Survey, Vol. 42, 1996, pp. 1-13.

[Here, Bevington compares Love's Labour's Lost to Lyly 's Sappho and Phao, maintaining that the play's contradictory portrayal of women—as objects of lust

Act V, scene ii. Princess, Boyet, and Ladies. Frontispiece to the Hanmer edition by Francis Hayman (¡744). Act V, scene ii. Princess, Boyet, and Ladies. Frontispiece to the Hanmer edition by Francis Hayman (¡744).
and of worship—leads to the characters ' unfulfilled desires and the play's unresolved ending.]

I begin with two perceptions: first, the observation of Robert Y. Turner that English comedy did not really find a successful way to dramatize love in any psychological sense before Lyly began his career as a playwright, and second, that of Alfred Harbage and others that Love's Labour's Lost is the most Lylyan of Shakespeare's plays.1 The Lyly play that immediately invites attention in this...

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This section contains 8,495 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the James L. Calderwood