Love's Labor's Lost | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 49 pages of analysis & critique of Love's Labor's Lost.
This section contains 13,454 words
(approx. 45 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Corum

SOURCE: “‘The Catastrophe Is a Nuptial’: Love's Labor's Lost, Tactics, Everyday Life,” in Renaissance Culture and the Everyday, edited by Patricia Fumerton and Simon Hunt, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999, pp. 271-98.

In the following essay, Corum reviews the critical debate concerning the problematic ending of Love's Labour's Lost, reassessing the play as a whole and the ending in particular in terms of its relevance to Elizabethan cultural views on adolescence.

I always thought marriage was one step away from death. 

—Sandra Bullock, The Late Show with David Letterman, 12:10 a.m., Friday, July 25, 1995

In such conditions, the heterogeneous elements, at least as such, find themselves subjected to a de facto censorship. … They cannot be kept within the field of consideration.

—Georges Bataille, Visions of Excess,1

“In the eighteenth century,” Michel de Certeau writes, “the ideology of the Enlightenment claimed that the book was capable of reforming society, that educational...

(read more)

This section contains 13,454 words
(approx. 45 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Corum
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Richard Corum from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook