Lost in the Funhouse | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Lost in the Funhouse.
This section contains 6,662 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carolyn Norman Slaughter

SOURCE: "Who Gets Lost in the Funhouse," in Arizona Quarterly, Vol. 44, No. 4, Winter, 1989, pp. 80-97.

In the essay below, Slaughter discusses the subject-object relationship as presented in Lost in the Funhouse from a Cartesian-Kantian perspective, asserting that Barth moves beyond the paralyzing postmodern concern with epistemology to propose narrative as a source of meaning.

Any story, any section of story, will do. This one:

There's no point in going farther; this isn't getting anybody answhere; they haven't even come to the funhouse yet. Ambrose is off the track, in some new or old part of the place that's not supposed to be used; he strayed into it by some one-in-a-million chance, like the time the roller-coaster car left the tracks in the nineteen-teens against all the laws of physics and sailed over the boardwalk in the dark. And they can't locate him because they don't know where to...

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This section contains 6,662 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Carolyn Norman Slaughter
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Critical Essay by Carolyn Norman Slaughter from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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