Little Dorrit | Critical Essay by Joss Lutz Marsh

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of Little Dorrit.
This section contains 18,659 words
(approx. 63 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Dominic Rainsford

Critical Essay by Joss Lutz Marsh

SOURCE: Marsh, Joss Lutz. “Inimitable Double Vision: Dickens, Little Dorrit, Photography, Film.” Dickens Studies Annual 22 (1993): 239-82.

In the following essay, Marsh discusses the 1987 film adaptation of Little Dorrit.

1: Interpretation and Adaptation

In 1987, working from a converted warehouse in London's run-down Docklands by the Dickensian name of Grice's Wharf, the little-known director Christine Edzard and Sands Films released an adaptation of Dickens's 1855-57 novel Little Dorrit that rivaled as few had thought film could do the convolutions and sheer length of its “un-cinematic” and sociocritical original. Her two-part film of Little Dorrit runs six hours—four times as long as a standard Hollywood movie. Part 1, Nobody's Fault, views the action from the point of view of diffident, middle-aged Arthur Clennam, just returned from twenty years' service to the family firm...

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This section contains 18,659 words
(approx. 63 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Dominic Rainsford