Li-Young Lee | Critical Review by Judith Kitchen

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Li-Young Lee.
This section contains 1,138 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Zhou Xiaojing

Critical Review by Judith Kitchen

SOURCE: Kitchen, Judith. “Speaking Passions.” Georgia Review 42, no. 2 (summer 1988): 407-22.

In the following excerpt, Kitchen describes the themes and style of Rose, examining their relationship to the imagery.

When a poem raises a lump in the throat time after time, it must either be terribly bad or terribly good. In the case of a young Chinese-American poet, Li-Young Lee, there is very little question as to how good these poems [in Rose] are. It's how they are good that is hard to define—a question Gerald Stern tackles, but does not answer, in his introduction to Rose. Stern compares Lee to Keats and Rilke, but I feel he is most like Neruda—the Neruda in love with the sensory experiences of the world, the Neruda of the wide associative leaps that make sense only...

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This section contains 1,138 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Zhou Xiaojing
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