Madeleine L'Engle | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Madeleine L'Engle.
This section contains 271 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Trudie Osborne

Like many a gossip who, in talking about others, chiefly reveals herself, this novel about adolescence ["Camilla Dickinson"] throws its strongest light on adulthood—a state which, if this book is correct, can only be described as a mess. (p. 14)

Most of the cast bespeaks hopelessness and futility and generally leaves a bad taste in the mouth. All the characters intrigue, but not all are clearly realized. In two cases the author has resorted to annoying tricks of speech to supplant inadequate characterization. They are Camilla's mother, who never ends a sentence, and David, a young veteran, who never properly begins one.

Camilla herself passes the fictional test of growth. In the opening pages she combines a precocious adult perception with the childish innocence of another age. It is a combination that might have stepped, if not from a book by one of the Brontës, certainly from...

(read more)

This section contains 271 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Trudie Osborne
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Trudie Osborne from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.