A Spectre is Haunting Texas | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of A Spectre is Haunting Texas.
This section contains 222 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alexei Panshin and Cory Panshin

A Specter Is Haunting Texas resembles Fritz Leiber's very first science fiction novel—Gather, Darkness!…—in being an intermittently satirical melodrama about revolution. The target of both satire and revolution in Gather, Darkness! was organized religion. The target in A Specter Is Haunting Texas is Texas—which is to say the American impulse toward gigantism. (p. 15)

The differences that twenty-five years have made are that the satire in Specter—while it lasts—is painted in broader strokes than the satire in Gather, Darkness! and that the revolution in the newer book is a temporary failure rather than a success. Otherwise, the books are much of a piece.

At its best, Specter is not particularly original. It covers ground covered better in the Fifties by H. Beam Piper and John J. McGuire…. [Its] greatest strength, in fact, is in conceits and occasional lines. And two-thirds of the way through...

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This section contains 222 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alexei Panshin and Cory Panshin
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Critical Essay by Alexei Panshin and Cory Panshin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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