D. H. Lawrence | Critical Essay by R. P. Blackmur

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of D. H. Lawrence.
This section contains 5,405 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by R. P. Blackmur

Critical Essay by R. P. Blackmur

SOURCE: "D. H. Lawrence and Expressive Form," in Language as Gesture: Essays in Poetry, Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1935, pp. 286-300.

In the following essay, Blackmur argues that Lawrence's poetry is too often marred by the author's unchecked inclusion of biographical detail and personal feelings.

As a poet, and only to a less degree as a novelist, Lawrence belongs to that great race of English writers whose work totters precisely where it towers, collapses exactly in its strength: work written out of a tortured Protestant sensibility and upon the foundation of an incomplete, uncomposed mind: a mind without defenses against the material with which it builds and therefore at every point of stress horribly succumbing to it. Webster, Swift, Blake, and Coleridge—perhaps Donne, Sterne, and Shelley, and on a lesser plane Marston, Thompson (of the Dreadful Night...

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This section contains 5,405 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by R. P. Blackmur
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