D. H. Lawrence | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by William J. Fisher

This literature criticism consists of approximately 13 pages of analysis & critique of D. H. Lawrence.
This section contains 3,646 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by William J. Fisher

SOURCE: "Peace and Passivity: The Poetry of D. H. Lawrence," in The South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 55, 1956, pp. 337-48.

In the following essay, Fisher examines what he believes is the paradoxical nature of Lawrence's poetry.

To read the poems of D. H. Lawrence after knowing his novels and other prose is to confront the paradox of the romantic. The rebellious individualism which distinguishes Lawrence's fiction is inverted in the poetry into a continuing desire to be merged, to be soothed into some harmonious and self-obliterating whole. In contrast with the turbulent fiction, Lawrence's poetry is generally temperate, expressing a craving for an "oblivion," for an "utter sleep," or for some other quiescent oneness. The passive conception and the passive image prevail: the poet yearns to be taken, touched, folded...

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This section contains 3,646 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William J. Fisher