Ring Lardner | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Ring Lardner.
This section contains 2,821 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Clifton Fadiman

SOURCE: "Ring Lardner and the Triangle of Hate," in The Nation, Vol. CXXXVI, No. 3533, March 22, 1933, pp. 315-17.

In the essay below, Fadiman accuses Lardner of viciousness, arguing that "the hates himself; more certainly he hates his characters; and most clearly of all, his characters hate each other."

There is a story about a famous orchestra conductor who during rehearsals noticed that the countenance of one of his best first violinists was overcast by a peculiarly woebegone and dissatisfied expression. For some time the musician refused to offer any explanation. Finally, after much urging, he owned up: "Well, maestro, I'll tell you how it is: I just don't like music."

The special force of Ring Lardner's work springs from a single fact: he just doesn't like people. Except Swift, no writer has gone farther on hatred alone. I believe he hates himself; more certainly he hates his characters; and...

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This section contains 2,821 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Clifton Fadiman
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