Lanford Wilson | Critical Essay by James J. Martine

This literature criticism consists of approximately 35 pages of analysis & critique of Lanford Wilson.
This section contains 10,290 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James J. Martine

Critical Essay by James J. Martine

SOURCE: Martine, James J. “Charlotte's Daughters: Changing Gender Roles and Family Structures in Lanford Wilson.” In Lanford Wilson: A Casebook, edited by Jackson R. Bryer, pp. 37-63. New York: Garland Publishing, 1994.

In the following essay, Martine investigates the evolving role of women in Wilson's plays.

There is no inconsistency in the fact that serious and important writers can be placed in a literary tradition while the contribution of their artistic originality is applauded. It is possible to appreciate Lanford Wilson's literary affinity to Luigi Pirandello, Thornton Wilder, Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller in matters of form; his relation thematically to William Faulkner and John Steinbeck as a confirmed humanist; an added indebtedness to Williams; and acknowledge concerns leading eventually back to Henrik Ibsen.

Audiences of several of Wilson's plays recognize, for example, the influence...

(read more)

This section contains 10,290 words
(approx. 35 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by James J. Martine
Follow Us on Facebook