William Kotzwinkle | Critical Essay by Roberta Tovey

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of William Kotzwinkle.
This section contains 137 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Roberta Tovey

Critical Essay by Roberta Tovey

Kotzwinkle knows that mysteries are the most satisfying of books not because everyone gets his just deserts but because in the best of them there are no gratuitous elements, no existential occurences. [In Fata Morgana] Inspector Picard follows the trail of the gypsy Lazare, and the elements which emerge from the fraudulent glitter of Paris—the abandoned lavishness of the masques, the tarot cards, the jeweled gowns trailing in the filth of the Paris streets—fall magically together. The world created has a sensuous order; the ending is a necessary irritation, and Kotzwinkle rather gracelessly disregards it. But the chase itself is perfect.

Roberta Tovey, "Books Considered: 'Fata Morgana'," in The New Republic (reprinted by permission of The New Republic; © 1977 The New Republic, Inc.), Vol. 176, No. 22, May 28, 1977, p. 40.

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This section contains 137 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Roberta Tovey
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