King Lear | King Lear: The Tragic Disjunction of Wisdom and Power

This literature criticism consists of approximately 28 pages of analysis & critique of King Lear.
This section contains 8,141 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the King Lear: The Tragic Disjunction of Wisdom and Power

Paul A. Cantor, University of Virginia

What is the price of Experience do men buy
it for a song
Or wisdom for a dance in the street? No it
is bought with the price
Of all that a man hath his house his wife
his children.

—William Blake, The Four Zoas

I

Many critics regard King Lear as the greatest of Shakespeare's plays and also as his most tragic. Indeed, many would claim that it is the most tragic play ever written. And yet, curiously, in most critical accounts of the play it is difficult to see why we should even regard it as tragic at all, whether we are using an Aristotelian or a Hegelian definition of tragedy. In the view of most critics, Lear is basically a pathetic old man, vain and foolish, rash in his judgment and...

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This section contains 8,141 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the King Lear: The Tragic Disjunction of Wisdom and Power