King Lear | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 32 pages of analysis & critique of King Lear.
This section contains 8,744 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alan Rosen

SOURCE: Rosen, Alan. “King Lear Without End: Shakespeare, Dramatic Theory, and the Role of Catastrophe.” In Dislocating the End: Climax, Closure and the Invention of Genre, pp. 6-26. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., 2001.

In the following essay, Rosen examines the unconventional dramatic form of King Lear, particularly the appearance of the climax early in the play instead of at the end, where it traditionally occurs.

That catastrophe informs the substance and texture of King Lear is clear. First performed in 1605-1606, a few years after James I assumed the throne, the play begins with a kingdom ruled by a majestic figure, presiding over a court of respectful and obedient subjects. However, the respect and obedience that grace Lear's court quickly dissipates; soon there is bitter internecine rivalry and eventually civil and international war. Meanwhile, the characters most worthy of our sympathy are subjected to brutality, afflicted with...

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This section contains 8,744 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alan Rosen
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Critical Essay by Alan Rosen from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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