King Lear | Critical Essay by William F. Zak

This literature criticism consists of approximately 40 pages of analysis & critique of King Lear.
This section contains 11,950 words
(approx. 40 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William F. Zak

Critical Essay by William F. Zak

SOURCE: “The Player King,” in Sovereign Shame: A Study of King Lear, Bucknell University Press, 1984, pp. 118-46.

In the following essay, Zak contrasts Shakespeare’s King Lear with the anonymously written The True Chronicle History of King Leir, and examines Lear’s self-destruction.

The king's a beggar, now the play is done. 

Epilogue, All's Well That Ends Well

Shame would have it hid. 

Gloucester, King Lear

From a study of the contrasts between the first scenes of The True Chronicle History of King Leir and Shakespeare's spare, truncated adaptation of them in the first half of scene one in King Lear, we can better inspect several related elements in Shakespeare's design. For one thing, it appears Shakespeare took great care to keep Lear's psyche cloaked, unavailable to immediate inspection, as if our...

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This section contains 11,950 words
(approx. 40 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William F. Zak