King Lear | Critical Essay by David Lowenthal

This literature criticism consists of approximately 48 pages of analysis & critique of King Lear.
This section contains 14,369 words
(approx. 48 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Lowenthal

Critical Essay by David Lowenthal

SOURCE: "King Lear," in Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philosophy, Vol. 21, No. 3, Spring, 1994, pp. 391-417.

In the essay that follows, Lowenthal reviews the setting, plot, language, characterization, and themes of King Lear, maintaining that in the last scene, the "perfections of king, father, and man" are fused together in Lear.

King Lear may be the most tragic of Shakespeare's tragedies. Nothing exceeds in pathos the final spectacle of Lear bending over his dead Cordelia, looking for life in her and then expiring himself. But what should we think of Lear generally? Is he the vain, irascible and doddering old man his critics make him out to be—a view quite close to the one held by his two bad daughters? Why, then, at the end, do we not only pity but admire him as a man of very great...

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This section contains 14,369 words
(approx. 48 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David Lowenthal