Thomas Keneally | Critical Essay by Blake Morrison

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Thomas Keneally.
This section contains 291 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Daphne Merkin

Critical Essay by Blake Morrison

Thomas Keneally's fictions are widely travelled: medieval Normandy, an 18th-century penal colony in the South Pacific, France in 1918, the Antarctic (twice)—you name it, they've been there. Passenger happens in the most exotic place of all: 'I sat in the black duchy of the amnion. Through the blood vessels of the placenta I took bounties from my mother's body—oxygens, minerals, carbohydrates.' This is no ordinary pregnancy:… [the foetus-narrator] has a precociously clear vision of the outside world. It's the Romantic idea of insightful childhood pushed one step further—the wise womb—and it makes for an old-fashioned omniscient narrative: the wide-awake foetus can see for miles and miles. His overview, though, is not exactly one of fingernail-paring detachment, for our unborn hero is threatened with the knives of abortion….

It may not be Keneally's best novel (The...

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This section contains 291 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Daphne Merkin
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