Ken Kesey | Critical Essay by Douglas Brinkley

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of Ken Kesey.
This section contains 1,380 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Douglas Brinkley

Critical Essay by Douglas Brinkley

SOURCE: Brinkley, Douglas. “A Final Word from the Last Merry Prankster.” Los Angeles Times Book Review (18 November 2001): 7.

In the following essay, Brinkley assesses the cultural impact of Kesey's life and writings on American society within the context of the events of September 11, 2001.

The Willamette Valley was still blanketed in a misty predawn darkness when the horrendous news hit an Oregon dairy farmer named Ken Kesey, author of such enduring fictional classics as One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes a Great Notion: Suicidal terrorists had attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, killing more than 4,300 people. “Everything was so clear that day, so unencumbered by theories and opinions, by thought, even,” the 66-year-old novelist e-mailed friends 10 days after the tragedy. “It just was. All just newborn images, ripped...

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This section contains 1,380 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Douglas Brinkley
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