Ken Kesey | Critical Review by Tom Shone

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of Ken Kesey.
This section contains 767 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paul Nastu

Critical Review by Tom Shone

SOURCE: Shone, Tom. “Going Cuckoo.” Times Literary Supplement, no. 4712 (23 July 1993): 19.

In the following review, Shone assesses the plot, style, and themes of Sailor Song, commenting that Kesey's prose has the “bounce of a piece of verbal pop art.”

Asked how he lost all of his teeth, a character in Ken Kesey's new novel [Sailor Song] replies, “Would you like to know one at a time?” The response is typical of a book in which characters trail enigmatic and eccentric prehistories like ticker-tape streamers, and whose names are soaked in home-brewed mythology: Alice the Angry Alert, Billy the Squid, and the book's reluctant hero, Ike Sallas, the Bakatchka Bandit.

Home, in their case, is the small Alaskan fishing village of Kuinak, an ecological idyll in an otherwise decrepit twenty-first century. Populated by Deaps (Descendents...

(read more)

This section contains 767 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paul Nastu
Follow Us on Facebook