John Keats | Lecture by Morris Dickstein

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of John Keats.
This section contains 2,828 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lecture by Morris Dickstein

SOURCE: "Keats and Politics," in Studies in Romanticism, Vol. 25, No. 2, Summer, 1986, pp. 175-81.

In the following lecture, given in 1983 and published in 1986, Dickstein argues that critics have wrongly "walled off Keats from the unseemly political passions of his contemporaries, " and goes on to identify the political aspects of Keats's poetry.

It is no doubt a thankless task to try to open up the question of "Keats and Politics" in a ten-minute paper, especially in a setting so unpolitical as a panel on "Aesthetic Creation in Keats." Try to imagine a comparable session devoted to something called "aesthetic creation" in Byron, or Shelley, or even Wordsworth; the very incongruity suggests how adamantly we have walled off Keats from the unseemly political passions of his contemporaries. "Of the major [Romantic] poets," says Carl Woodring, with just the right tinge of irony, "Keats is thought to have evaded most...

(read more)

This section contains 2,828 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lecture by Morris Dickstein
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Lecture by Morris Dickstein from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.