John Keats | Critical Essay by Richard Harter Fogle

This literature criticism consists of approximately 30 pages of analysis & critique of John Keats.
This section contains 8,889 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Richard Harter Fogle

SOURCE: "Concrete and Abstract Imagery," in The Imagery of Keats and Shelley: A Comparative Study, Archon Books, 1949, pp. 184-240.

In the following excerpt, published originally in 1949, Fogle examines the characteristics of what many critics describe as the "concreteness" of Keats's imagery. Fogle demonstrates that Keats's technique of focusing his perceptions upon single objects results in the extraction of "the last drop of beauty and meaning" and also affects the metrical structure of the poetry.

I

Critics are generally agreed that the imagery of Keats is "concrete." Robert Bridges, for example, in comparing his "Sleep and Poetry" with Wordsworth's Tintern Abbey, points out "the extreme difference between Keats' objective treatment and Wordsworth's philosophising," citing to show the contrast the older poet's

 The coarser pleasures of my boyish days
And their glad animal movements

over against Keats's

 A pigeon tumbling...

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This section contains 8,889 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Harter Fogle