A Streetcar Named Desire | Critical Essay by Karel Reisz

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of A Streetcar Named Desire.
This section contains 382 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Karel Reisz

Kazan's film of [A Streetcar Named Desire] gives one of the first opportunities to see what can be done with [harsh, class-conscious realism] in the cinema….

Behind [the protagonists's] personal drama there develops the conflict of values which Tennessee Williams has explored elsewhere: the clash between the young and the old; the sordidly real and the magically bogus; between the precarious dignity of Stanley's primitive sensual nature and Blanche's equally vulnerable refinement. (p. 170)

The style does not transplant readily to the screen. Tennessee Williams' script … changes little of the original. All the usual objections to stage adaptations apply; there is too much talk, too little broad action, and the contrived unnecessary excursions into exterior sets merely break up the narrative's rhythm—the brief scene with Stanley at the factory seems particularly arbitrary. Over and above this, there...

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This section contains 382 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Karel Reisz