The Story of an Hour | Critical Essay by Lawrence L. Berkove

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of The Story of an Hour.
This section contains 3,240 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lawrence L. Berkove

SOURCE: Berkove, Lawrence L. “Fatal Self-Assertion in Kate Chopin's ‘The Story of an Hour.’” American Literary Realism 32, no. 2 (winter 2000): 152-58.

In the following essay, Berkove contends that Chopin's narration of “The Story of an Hour” is ironic rather than straightforward.

Kate Chopin's thousand-word short story, “The Story of an Hour,” has understandably become a favorite selection for collections of short stories as well as for anthologies of American literature. Few other stories say so much in so few words. There has been, moreover, virtual critical agreement on what the story says: its heroine dies, ironically and tragically, just as she has been freed from a constricting marriage and has realized self-assertion as the deepest element of her being. Confidence in this interpretation, however, may be misplaced, for using the standard...

(read more)

This section contains 3,240 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Lawrence L. Berkove
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Lawrence L. Berkove from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook