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Critical Essay | Critical Essay by Cynthia Marshall

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Critical Essay by Cynthia Marshall.
This section contains 6,673 words
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Critical Essay by Cynthia Marshall

SOURCE: “Portia's Wound, Calphurnia's Dream: Reading Character in Julius Caesar,” in English Literary Renaissance, Vol. 24, No. 2, Spring, 1994, pp. 471-88.

In the following essay, Marshall discusses Portia's self-wounding and Calphurnia's dream of Caesar's death as they represent the linguistic instability of character in Julius Caesar.

“If the body had been easier to understand, nobody would have thought that we had a mind.”1

Roland Barthes sardonically described the Mankiewicz film of Julius Caesar as portraying “a universe without duplicity, where Romans are Romans thanks to the most legible of signs: hair on the forehead.”2 The film's use of hair fringes to signify Roman identity and its use of sweat to signify thought were to Barthes examples of “degraded spectacle...

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This section contains 6,673 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Critical Essay by Cynthia Marshall - Critical Essay by Cynthia Marshall
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