Julius Caesar | Critical Essay by Cynthia Damon

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of Julius Caesar.
This section contains 5,618 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cynthia Damon

SOURCE: “Caesar's Practical Prose,” in Classical Journal, Vol. 89, No. 2, December-January, 1994, pp. 183-95.

In the following essay, Damon explains that, in reading De Bello Civili, it is important to recognize the character traits of the individuals discussed; to understand Caesar's narrative as a Roman would have; to notice repeated events; and to realize that recurrent events can lead to different outcomes.

Thirty years ago, when Matthias Gelzer had the opportunity of addressing an audience of teachers of Latin and ancient history, he chose for his topic “Caesar as an historian.”1 He argued that Caesar was not an historian in the modern sense of the word—not objective, not dependent on inadequate sources, not university trained—but that his commentarii were, given ancient criteria for the genre, historiographical texts, something to set beside Sallust for the history...

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This section contains 5,618 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Cynthia Damon
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Cynthia Damon from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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