Julius Caesar | Lecture by C. E. Stevens

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Julius Caesar.
This section contains 6,631 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
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Lecture by C. E. Stevens

SOURCE: “The Bellum Gallicum as a Work of Propaganda,” in Latomus, Vol. 11, 1952, pp. 2-18.

In the following essay, originally delivered as a lecture in 1951, Stevens examines instances in De Bello Gallico in which Caesar conceals the truth or interprets events self-servingly.

It is not possible to consider the Bellum Gallicum as a work of propaganda unless a position can be taken up on the date of its composition. We know from external evidence only that it was published not later than 46 b. c.1, but the fact that the story of the campaign of 51 b. c. is written by another hand would lead us to suspect that Caesars's own books of the commentaries were written, as has long been the general belief of scholars2, in the winter of 52-51 b. c. The campaign of 52 b. c., though...

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This section contains 6,631 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lecture by C. E. Stevens
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