Julius Caesar | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 25 pages of analysis & critique of Julius Caesar.
This section contains 6,189 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William R. Bowden

SOURCE: Bowden, William R. “The Mind of Brutus.” Shakespeare Quarterly 17, no. 1 (winter 1966): 57-67.

In the following essay, Bowden describes Brutus as self-righteous and intellectually limited.

A bothersome passage in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is Brutus' accusation of Cassius in the celebrated quarrel scene:

                                                            I did send to you For certain sums of gold, which you denied me: For I can raise no money by vile means: By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash By any indirection: I did send To you for gold to pay my legions, Which you denied me: was that done like Cassius? 

(IV.iii.69-77)1

These lines have elicited a good deal of scholarly comment (as what lines in Shakespeare have not?), but I do not know that their implications in an assessment of Brutus' character...

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This section contains 6,189 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William R. Bowden
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Critical Essay by William R. Bowden from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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