Pamela Hansford Johnson | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Pamela Hansford Johnson.
This section contains 522 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Marigold Johnson

A Bonfire is an odd novel and its mix of memory, morality and mundane fancy is finally less than satisfying. It is like a plot retold by a child who sees quite clearly a detailed pattern but hasn't been warned against starting sentences with "And then". But it has the same sort of direct appeal, plunging matter-of-fact into emotion and event with brisk and plangent language. Emma is full of innocent yearnings when her father dies the night of the Guy Fawkes party, which is also the night her mother Agnes has explained to her the meaning of adultery and Emma, aged fourteen, thinks she'd prefer being a nun. Can it be this chance but traumatic conjunction which leads to the poor girl's final conviction that her sexual gratifications, blessed or unblessed, have irrevocably destined her for "the everlasting bonfire"?…

The cynic might comment that if Emma had...

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This section contains 522 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Marigold Johnson
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Gale
Critical Essay by Marigold Johnson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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