Pamela Hansford Johnson | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Pamela Hansford Johnson.
This section contains 211 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Gillian Wilce

Already widely praised, A Bonfire does possess those qualities noted by others—a modest style conveying an honest perception of the way things were in the Twenties and Thirties. This much-remarked-upon feel for period is perhaps not as impressive as the psychological accuracy. After all, it has been possible much more recently for a young woman to feel the same half-real fear of the eternal bonfire at the end of the primrose path of sexual self-indulgence that lurks in Emma's consciousness during the three marriages and one one-night stand which occupy her up to age 26. The fondness, irritations and fluctuations of influence between mother and daughter are also faithfully reflected. Life is about making do. Money has to be earned, accommodation sought, envelopes addressed for the Labour Party. A more complete world is mirrored here than the slimness of the book might suggest. The craftsmanship can't be faulted...

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This section contains 211 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Gillian Wilce
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Gale
Critical Essay by Gillian Wilce from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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