Pamela Hansford Johnson | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Pamela Hansford Johnson.
This section contains 380 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kenneth Graham

There is nothing of the fantastic in Pamela Hansford Johnson. The Survival of the Fittest is wholesome and sustaining and dramatically un-American. It describes the lives of a group of friends, all of them in or close to 'the literary world', during the 1930s, the war years, and, briefly, up to the Sixties…. [They] become entangled with one another in various love-affairs and animosities, marry unexpectedly, or divorce, or fail to marry; come to tragic ends, or flourish in middle-aged prosperity beneath the apple-trees in Sussex. Technically, the book is impeccable—except for one disruptively high-pitched excursus to the Russian steppes, where the real writer of the group dies dramatically in picturesque surroundings. The book's quiet, even tone, though monotonous, allows for a certain cumulative strength, and there are places where the very usualness of the human cycle of grief and reconciliation gives dignity and feeling to the...

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This section contains 380 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kenneth Graham
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Gale
Critical Essay by Kenneth Graham from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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